Sunday, May 22, 2005

Fry Bread & Architecture

I am a huge fan of Frank Lloyd Wright, more because of his personality than a deep appreciation for his architecture. Its undeniable that he was a genius. But, you know, as great an architect as he was, he was not an engineer. As a result, though very beautiful, many of his buildings have serious problems, which today engineers are having to go back and address. Its kind of a shame that Wright didn’t work with engineers at the time he was planning his structures in order to avoid this. One of my favorite movies is “Smoke Signals”. It is set in the Native American community and centers around two young men, one of whom’s father has just passed. The young man, Victor, is kind of aloof and cool. He needs to go and take care of his father’s belongings but has no way to make the journey unless he accepts the help of his bookworm, very uncool, childhood friend. In order to encourage him to accept help, his mother talks to him about fry bread. She is well known among the people for making the best fry bread around. She tells her son, Victor, " You know I didn'’t learn to make great fry bread on my own. I had help. I had to listen to people.”" Then she proceeds to explain to him that over the years when people told her that her bread needed a little more of this or that, she would pay attention. I love this story, because it illustrates so well what happens when we allow ourselves to be open and learn from each other, rather than being defensive and shutting each other out. We really do need each other.

I Corinthians 12:27 "Now you are the body of Christ, and each one of you is a part of it."

2 comments:

Constantine said...

If you get a moment, see a post I made on my Blog today (5-23) entitled "The Oddness of Everything." I think that it speaks to the same idea you point out here when you said, "it illustrates so well what happens when we allow ourselves to be open and learn from each other, rather than being defensive and shutting each other out."

Here’s the gist of the post I’m referring to (a brief article by George F. Will in Newsweek). From the last paragraph: “America is currently awash in an unpleasant surplus of clanging, clashing certitudes. That is why there is a rhetorical bitterness absurdly disproportionate to our real differences. It has been well said that the spirit of liberty is the spirit of not being too sure that you are right."

voixdange said...

Read it, love it, highly recommend it. Thanks!